TEFAF and the City (Blog 2- Microsculpture) 

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After having experienced the intense and dark world of David Lynch at the Bonnefantenmuseum (see blog 1), I am cycling to the Natural History Museum of Maastricht. It is pretty crowded on Saturday, especially because families with children can do several activities in the museum today. On the ground floor there is an intimate room, which show a dozen amazing blow-ups of insects. The exhibit is called Microsculpture, and can be visited until the 21rd of April. 

This is a ground-breaking project by the British photographer Levon Biss. He presents different insects species which reveal breathtaking beauty, powerful colors and the intricate structure of the tiny animals. The insects really come to live on the black backgrounds, and the prinst have a very high quality. Also the images are incredible detailed. You can see the seams and lines of the transparent wings of the deep dark green Orchid cuckoo bee. You almost want to touch the furry skin of the Silver longhorn Beetle. And how about the magnificent patterns of the Jewel longhorned Beetle; it is almost hypnotizing. 

Biss has worked on macrophotography for the past five years. But actually he is more famous for his work on sports, reportage and portraiture. For Microsculpture he collaborated with the Oxford University Museum of Natural History. 

The reactions of the visiting children are interesting; on the one hand they are curious and impressed, but insects like the Marion Island Moth, the Flying Saucer Trench Beetle and especially the Tortoise Beetle and the Treehopper are also a bit scary. “They look like aliens”, I hear some kids say. And that is true, but also shows the power of macrophotography. 

Read in Blog 3 about my last visit to The Girl, the dress and the pearl. 

 

Text & images: Angelique van Os | note: of course the credits of the origional images are of Levon Biss

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