Tesoro Nero Ltd

Tesoro Nero produce luxury self playing designer grand pianos. Such spectacular instruments take a great deal of time, effort, and resources to get perfect. This makes our pianos extraordinarily unique, ensuring that you really stand out from the crowd. Our pianos know no bounds. No one can rival our stunning masterpieces; they stand unparalleled in the world of music, displaying a rare and inimitable spectacle of beauty.

Company details

Website
Visit website
Tags
Antique & Art, Collectables, Home & Decoration, Leisure & Lifestyle, Other
Other 27 Feb 2020

tesoro nero & saving the bees

When I was younger, I remember how excited I'd be at my first sight of a big fat bumblebee each spring, humming across my primary school's field, floating like a striped ball of fuzz from flower to nectar-rich flower. I remember the purple lavander in our back garden flourishing with life, enriching the air with its familiar perfume. Bees swarmed about its fragrant blossom in multitudes, and I would sit and watch them with a glass of orange juice in my hand for what could have easily been hours, delighting in the end of winter.  But now, years later, things are different. I no longer see the bees drifting between flowers, settling on petals and sipping nectar. It is very rare that I see a black and yellow form hovering beside the lilac lavander, humming contentedly as it works. Now, if I see bees, I see them lethargic, crawling, and unable to fly; or I see them dead. It is strange to think that it has only taken a short period of time for the bees to become so seriously threatened. It makes me wonder how much longer they have left on this planet before they are all gone for good. But what is causing such a rapid decline in the bee population? I did some research and found several reasons for this. It has opened my eyes to the threats that bees are facing right now, and the situation is even more urgent than I had previously realised. Intensive farming is the largest cause of bee decline, heightened by the increased use of harmful pesticides, such as neonicotinoids, which are having disastrous effects on wild bees. Used to kill pests, they are inevitably killing beneficial pollinators like bees along with them. When a bee feeds from a flower containing pesticides, it disturbs their central nervous system, affecting their ability to carry out essential tasks such as feeding, homing, reproducing, and foraging. Bees and other pollinators need enough flowers to forage, and safe places in which to nest among vegetation, soil, and hedges. But, since WWII, we have lost 97% of our wildflower meadows, and this leaves bees with very little natural habitat in which to thrive. Climate change plays an enormous role in disrupting the bees' natural behaviour, in terms of their foraging habits, their emergence after winter, nesting, and, the flowering of the plants from which they feed. Plus, invasive species, such as the Asian Hornet, could devastate British species if left to take hold.  In the UK, we have already lost around 13 species of bee, and another 35 are currently at risk of extinction. Losing bees would severely impact our planet, and cost farmers £1.8 billion to pollinate their crops without the help of pollinators. These little insects, although small, are incredibly significant. If we were unfortunate enough to lose them for good, our world and our lives would be much less rich and vibrant. Imagine our planet with only a fraction of the colour and diversity we have today. Our food will become tasteless, our diets will become dull, and our landscapes will become colourless. Costs will rise as farmers will have to pollinate their own crops without the help of bees. If we continue to undermine the importance of bees and the role they play on our planet, then there is every chance that we will lose them forever. It is only when they are gone for good that we will regret having done nothing.  At Tesoro Nero, we support the charities and conservations that dedicate their time to helping these humble honey-makers. We have designed a 24K gold piano with a hexagonal texture to mimic the lustrous shine and structure of honeycomb. With every purchase of our piano, a considerable sum of the profits will be donated to leading bee conservation charities. We will not stand aside and let the bees die out. Right now, they need us almost as much as we need them. There is so much we can do to help, so why not start here?

Other 07 Jan 2020

the language of music

Our world is rich, vibrant, and full of diversity, and our world of music is no different. There are musical instruments out there that reveal to us so much of the world that we didn't even know existed. They embody entire cultures, people and their beliefs, echo thoughts, feelings, and dreams, and re-tell age-old stories over and over again. Like living entities, they play the messengers to our thoughts and emotions. Whatever language we speak, the language of music can be understood by all.Around the world, there are instruments we all know and cherish, from pianos to guitars, violins to saxophones. Yet, there are other instruments out there that are a little less known to us than the ones we are used to.They are ancient instruments that have existed and evolved for over hundreds of years. While some of these remarkable instruments have successfully stood the test of time, sadly, not all have been able to claim a place in the modern world as securely as they once did.But music itself is timeless. A thousand years from now, our world will have evolved, and the language of music will have evolved with it. While some instruments may continue to fade away until they become little more than exhibits in a museum, silent behind glass, others can become just as popular as ever, adapting to the ever-changing language and creating something new that has never been heard before. In China, the guqin is an ancient string instrument created thousands of years ago, but is still played today to create beautiful, dream-like music unlike any instrument heard before. Famous Chinese philosopher, Confucius, adored this exquisite instrument, and even played one himself. The guqin has many qualities, believed to enrich character, enhance lives, improve learning, and communicate and pray to gods and demons. During the Ming Dysnasty, between 1368 and 1644, it was believed that the right time to play the guqin was outside in a mountain environment, in a garden or small pavilion, near an old pine tree or on a tranquil moonlit night, while the air was delicately perfumed with incense. This graceful instrument has played a vital role in Chinese history and music, and will hopefully continue to do so for many more centuries to come.  The sarangi is another stringed instrument, and its origins come from the Indian subcontinent. Used in Hindustani classical music, it is said to be the instrument that most resembles the human voice out of all the instruments in the world. Because of this, most distinguished Indian vocalists learned how to play the sarangi. Sadly, in the latter half of the 19th century, the harmonium and the violin emerged, and, with them being ultimately easier instruments to play, the sarangi and the sarangi player slowly began to fade away. The playing strings of this instrument are made from gut, the usual material being goat intestines. The unique voice of this remarkable instrument embodies the vibrant beauty of India and its people; and while it may not be as popular as it once was, those who do continue to play the sarangi keep its memory alive for as long as its voice continues to be heard. In Africa, musical instruments can be used to communicate with both man and spirit. Some may be used for religious and ceremonial occasions, while others can be simply for entertainment. These instruments all range in shape, size, and complexity, many made from natural materials using age-old methods. Percussion plays a vital role in African music. The shekere is a drum made from dried and hollowed out gourd, covered with a net that has beads or shells on it, so when the drum is beaten, the beads hit the surface and make a sound. There is the djembe, a goblet-shaped drum, which has the ability to make different sounds when beaten, and is played strictly by hand. The balafon is an instrument similar to the xylophone, made from wood, gourds, and vines. In some African cultures, the balafon has ceremonial significance related to funerals, grief, and mourning. Music is an incredible way to break barriers, build bridges, communicate and connect. As a messenger it will never become extinct. It will continue to evolve and adapt as we do. And nowhere else in the world is this more apparent than in Africa.  The nyckelharpa, as a traditional Swedish fiddle, is a close relative of the hurdy gurdy. A four-stringed instrument played with a bow, the nyckelharpa is probably the most well-known and adored instrument in Swedish folklore. It dates back from the Middle-Ages, and has evolved for more than 600 years. The nyckelharpa almost became extinct in the early 1900s, but in the 1960s and 70s, this beautiful instrument made a phenomenal come-back. There are now at least 4 variations of the instrument today, which is something of a rarity for folk instruments. It creates an eerie but enchanting sound, somewhat resembling the violin in both music and appearance. The nyckelharpa brings Scandinavian folklore to life with its hauntingly beautiful voice, leading ancient ghosts into the modern world. More well-known worldwide, the didgeridoo is a wind instrument made from hollowed out wood. It is believed that the first didgeridoos were played by aboriginal people in northern Australia an estimated 40,000 years ago, and that they used eucalyptus branches that had been naturally hollowed out by termites. However, archaelogical research suggests that the didgeridoo is only about 1500 years old. This is due to the absence of cave paintings depicting humans playing the didgeridoo earlier than 1500 years ago. Despite its age, Western society has only recently become acquainted with the didgeridoo. In 1835, 47 years after the Europeans colonised Australia, the first written account of the didgeridoo was published, where it was described as a trumpet. Modern didgeridoos are made from eucalyptus, bamboo, and agave. It is both a pitched instrument and a percussive instrument, used in many world music applications such as beatboxing, dance, and meditation. With its raw and guttural voice, the didgeridoo embodies the fierce Australian wilderness, and represents the ancient spirits of the people who played this same fascinating instrument almost two thousand years ago. Sometimes the most captivating instruments are the least obvious to us. We appreciate the beauty of music no matter who we are or where we live. Whatever language we speak, we can all understand music and the intricate messages that each and every note presents to us. Thousands of years ago, we used music to convey stories, thoughts, dreams, and emotions. Today, in our modern world, this has not changed. For how much longer will humankind continue to listen to and speak the language of music? Will it ever be silenced?Judging by its incredible ability to adapt, music could never be silenced. It is as significant to our world today as it was several centuries ago. But now, more people have greater access to a huge variety of instruments. There is so much more to discover, so much more to learn. The language music speaks is ageless. We have time. 

Other 10 Dec 2019

tesoro nero & wild cats

Two Worlds IntertwinedOur world is made up of the most beautiful and resilient creatures that affect our lives more than we could ever understand. Among them are the wild cats. Not only do they inhabit the mountains, the savannahs, the jungles, and the rainforests, but these remarkable animals have occupied a special place in our hearts for several lifetimes. Wild cats possess a fierce majesty, free and untamed, an almost mythical allure within the vast expanse of our imaginations. So rarely do our physical worlds intertwine; most of us will walk through life without once capturing a single, wild glimpse of one of these amazing creatures. Our lives are so very different, yet, we encounter these animals every day more than we even know. They have fuelled our imaginations for centuries. They have been anthropomorphised, given human gait and speech. They have been venerated for their beauty and the mystery that surrounds them. They have made regular appearances in our various cultures, in stories with which we have grown up and cherished throughout our lives. Bagheera and Shere Khan from The Jungle Book, Aslan from Narnia, The Lion King and The Pink Panther - just a few examples of how these remarkable cats have ignited our imaginations. The Circle of LifeWe have all seen the film The Lion King, and we all know the famously uttered line, 'the circle of life'. This is more than just a well-known maxim - it is the foundation of how we all live, from lion prides in Africa, solitary snow leopards in India, and ourselves and our families at home.Wild cats help to maintain a balanced eco-system, ensuring that one species does not overpopulate and disrupt the natural equilibrium. By targeting the diseased, weak, and elderly prey when out hunting, these wild cats ensure that only the healthiest reproduce. It is Nature's way of ensuring that 'the circle of life' is upheld.Wild Cats in DangerThe future of these wild cats is severely threatened. With the loss and fragmentation of their habitat, they struggle to find food, mates, and a safe territory. Their prey is overhunted, leaving them unable to hunt successfully for themselves and for their cubs. Conflict with local people over real and perceived threat posed to livestock means that wild cats are slaughtered. They are illegally poached for trophies, their skin, meat, and parts of their body for use in traditional medicine. Due to so many dangers posed to their survival, these incredible animals need our help. And what will happen if they disappear forever? All we'll have left of these cats will be in our stories, nothing more than ink on a page or millions of tiny pixels on a screen. We will be left with myths, with wraiths of memories, with the bitter knowledge that we could have always done something, but we chose to do nothing instead. We will have to explain to our children why we allowed these animals to be forgotten, and they will hate us for it.Tesoro Nero & PantheraSo how are we helping to protect these magnificant animals when they are at their most vulnerable? Tesoro Nero has created a piano to reflect the beauty of one of Nature's rarest creatures. With every purchase of one of our panther pianos, we will donate a considerable sum of our profits to Panthera, a trusted organisation dedicated to saving the threatened future of wild cats everywhere.Panthera conducts significant research, identifying and protecting these wild cats and their habitats, monitoring their populations as well as the population of their prey. They collect critical ecological data and enhance law enforcement, ensuring a healthy and sustained ecosystem is kept in place. Using cutting-edge technology, they can prevent poaching and protect these animals from being needlessly slaughtered. By purchasing our panther piano, you will be helping Panthera carry out all of this incredible research, and helping to save these beautiful wild cats who desperately need our help.We Refuse to ForgetWe refuse to forget about the wild cats and to simply let them fade away into dust, to disappear into the furthest crevices of our minds only to be lost forever. We refuse to forget about our connections with Nature, and of everything that makes us human. It is our duty to protect the creatures with whom we share our earth. We refuse to forget how important these wild cats are, and how they have shaped us as a species. If we lose them, then we lose a part of ourselves forever. 

Other 25 Nov 2019

origins of the piano

The modern piano has undergone a great evolutionary journey throughout the centuries. From around 1600, the harpsichord was one of the leading instruments of the era. It resembled the piano with its appearance, and its system of strings and soundboard. But the harpsichord had its restrictions - it did not give the player freedom to control the instrument's volume, to play notes loud or soft. It was Bartolomeo Cristofori of Italy who, in around the year 1700, set out to create an instrument with which a player would have more control. He invented the piano by replacing the harpsichord's plucking mechanism with a hammer. The first piano started out with only 54 keys, but this number gradually increased over the centuries until it finally reached the standard 88 keys following the First World War. Pianos were mostly limited to the aristocracy, until the French Revolution occurred in 1789. Subsequently, they became more popular with the general public, and demands for these instruments increased. Music that had also been previously appreciated by aristocrats in their exclusive courts was now being performed in large concert halls that seated up to 2,000 people. This created a greater demand for instruments that had a louder sound and carried further.Many famous composers fell in love with the piano and its music, composing stunning masterpieces and performing in public concerts. The piano has been a part of our lives from the beginning, and our love for it has only continued to grow. From grand concert halls to the privacy and comfort of one's own home, the piano belongs to everyone. It was created to be without limits. It became an instrument to be beheld and enjoyed by all. There was no barrier between rich and poor, amateur and professional. People from all walks of life were united by music. The piano is an expressive instrument, almost alive, with every single note it breathes.Rich with soul and feeling, the piano captivates us all. Even today, in our fast-paced, modern world, we can still find the time to slow down, sit back, and appreciate its rich and vibrant music. There are so many ways we can now enjoy our music, but nothing is quite so powerful as the melody of the piano. It can be poignant and full of sadness, soft and dreamy, sharp and intense, joyful and uplifting. Like a living creature, the piano possesses soul. It owns laughter, it owns heartbreak. Every string murmurs with feeling, tearing down unbreakable barriers, and we reveal a side of ourselves to others in a way we were unable to before.Strengthened by the piano's exquisite voice, it heals us, whatever our emotions, our hardships, our fragility. There is very little out there that can move us the same way a piano can. It will never be antiquated, a timeworn fossil. It has influenced us for many lifetimes, and it will continue to influence us for many more lifetimes to come. 

Other 19 Nov 2019

the songs of nature

'Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and life to everything' - PlatoFor thousands of years, we have cherished the soul of music. It is more than just sound in the air, more than just ink on paper. We use it to mirror our thoughts, bring to life complex emotions that can otherwise be lost in translation. Ancient armies used music to rally their soldiers into a fierce and fiery passion, to strike terror into the hearts of their enemies. We have always used music to tell stories, to manipulate the heartstrings of listeners with the ease of a puppeteer manipulating the strings of a marionette. Music gives us the power to speak without words. Even somewhere devoid of all human influence, there is rarely silence. Deep within the gloomiest rainforests, a choir waits, silent, concealed by the leaves and shadows. Its audience, unseen, but out there somewhere. Throats swell, songs rise, and a cacophony of voices suddenly engulfs the silence of the trees. The male frogs serenade their invisible females, coax them out of the darkness like a love-struck Romeo serenading Juliet beneath her ivy-clad balcony. And in the darkness, within the shadows of the sickle moon, a lone wolf raises his head and sings at the stars, fills the sky with the echoes of his haunted voice. He is a ghost, mourning his solitude, and his song is a lonely one. It carries further than he will ever wander.Songbirds warble joyfully in the trees, and even the caged canary must sing to keep his soul alive. We cherish the lark for her beautiful lovelorn ballads, the hooting owl for his soothing lullabies. We are captivated by the songs of Nature. We have listened to them, learned from them, taken from them something that is primitive and raw, and transformed them into entirely new creatures. There are many voices, each one demanding to be heard. Music has existed longer than we have. We do not possess it, nor do we claim to. We merely embrace it, allow it to embrace us, to nourish our fettered emotions, and to set them free.